Silverstone Raven

Silverstone isn’t exactly a name connected with gaming peripherals, but the company is looking to change that with its new gaming mouse dubbed the Raven.

Silverstone isn’t exactly a name connected with gaming peripherals, but the company is looking to change that with its new gaming mouse dubbed the Raven.

First things first, the design of the mouse tells us two things; that the engineers at Silverstone weren’t happy with the traditional look of mice, and that they all have gigantic hands. Not content with a single scroll wheel, they decided the most natural place for a second one would be where your thumb normally rests. This leaves the mouse with a plethora of buttons, 10 to be exact, in addition to the two scroll wheels and a rather nice OLED screen. The screen shows your current DPI and profile.

By default, you can cycle through 4 different DPI settings, ranging from 400 to a ludicrous 3200, by pressing the scroll wheel next to your thumb. Unfortunately, the more traditional thumb buttons are placed in front of the scroll wheel, making it nearly impossible to reach them unless you happen to be the Jolly Green Giant. A button underneath the mouse lets you change between ‘normal’ and ‘game’ modes and in game mode you can assign DPI values to four different profiles.

This is where the Raven brings something great to the table. Serious gamers have often lamented the lack of separate Y and X axis controls for gaming mice, without having to manually input it through third party software. The Raven will let you assign separate values, meaning vertical and horizontal DPI can be different. This means you could have a higher separate DPI in a game where the Y axis is used more, i.e. vertical rather than horizontal movement.

There is no getting around the design of the mouse, however. The side wheel and button seem to add very little to the usability of the mouse, and more to the hype factor. Having the side wheel lit up in blue screams 2004 to us, although the rest of the mouse is nicely coloured and relatively comfortable except for the side scroller. What could have been a great mouse has unfortunately been made decidedly average with the addition of the side wheel. The only glimmer of hope would be for games with a massive in-game directory or need for mouse macros.

It looks like Silverstone, despite good intentions, overshot the mark on this one. They do, however, have the basic recipe right, and we look forward to the second generation gaming mouse from them.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Jan Birkeland

Unknown Publication
Show Comments

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?